Culture Tips

Travel diary Tahiti

The road between Taiohae and Taipivai being built of good quality concrete, it is easy to cross the mountain to enter the “valley of cannibals.”

Rare endemic palm trees

tahiti islandsThe continuation of our Melville’s Polynesian life was a little agitated, but it is in Taipivai that we will remain for a few days. The valley, at the bottom of the Bay of the Controller, is closed by an impressive basalt wall from which seems to escape a vertiginous cascade; with a guide, it will be easy for you to go there and enjoy a bath in the vas

Beforehand, it is essential to pay a small visit to the half shadow and half sunshine corner that houses the last palm trees of the Marquesas, Pelagodoxa henryana, locally called “enu.”

These endemic palm trees, botanical rarities, are only a small dozen, but their rough walnuts are carefully collected and then placed in glasshouses and replanted; the species itself is therefore very threatened in nature, but on the other hand, it is nowadays relatively widespread in the gardens of connoisseurs.


On the road that climbs up towards Hatiheu, a stopover is unavoidable, that of the meae Paeke.
A small sign on the left side of the road indicates the direction of the road on the way up.

It is enough to park there and follow the small path, in places very ravined by the rains, which leads, after twenty minutes of reasonable efforts, to a unique architectural ensemble. A meae which contained twelve tiki and which shelters ten of them today (a few other stones very degraded, almost formless, being able to correspond to the old tiki missing from the call).

The site is composed of two beautifully restored platforms encompassing in their walls nine tiki enclosures, the largest of which measures more than one meter seventy.

A pebble chapel

lagoons and coralsBack on the road, you just have to go down towards the sea to admire the tohua recently built in the center of the village, which allows, during art festivals, to offer an exceptional setting to the troops who perform, dancers, singers, and musicians, as well as to the public.

A significant hat-trick to the Taipivai town hall, which has created a magnificent and functional cultural space, a space that is also very well maintained.
Further down, the small road winds its way to Hooumi; stop off at the small covered chapel and the adjacent one, in the open sky, built from the remains of paepae.

Visiting Bali? Some Cultural Do’s and Don’ts to Stay Respectful

Hey guys!

Today, I’ll be sharing some cultural tips with you guys. I visited Bali, Indonesia again last year. It’s seriously one of my favorite go-to places. The beaches are lovely and there’s so much to take in regarding folklore and food!

It’s one of the best places to go to if you want to really experience intact cultural traditions of the SEA (South East Asia). So without further ado, let’s jump into cultural Do’s and Don’ts!

Keep your left hand to yourself

This might take a bit of getting used to. There is a reason for this though. As it turns out, toilet paper has never really been a thing in Bali. So they do all their washing business with the left hand. As such, they consider it vastly impolite to touch or even hand something to another person using the left hand.

Do yourself a favor and be mindful about this rule. The last thing you’d want is to offend a newfound friend in Bali.

Dress respectfully

The culture here is modest. If you’re ever going to go out and visit cultural landmarks like temples, it is critical that you dress appropriately. Traditionally, they require sarongs for the legs and temple scarves around the waist. They’re totally cool about flip-flops though as long as it’s not flashy. If you’re worried about the sarongs and temple scarves, chill. They rent those out by the temple entrance. Or you can do one better and buy local. That way you’ll get a better deal and you’ll get to keep a piece of Bali with you. Also, you’d have ended up helping a local. Win-win for all!

Please watch what you step on

I had a bit of a rough run-in with this rule back when I was 14. I was going around and I noticed these little packages on the street. These were little woven palm leaves and they were everywhere. Dumb kid that I was, I never really thought they were anything special until I stepped on one. Boy! Was the local lady who saw me super mad!

As it turns out, those things are offering to their God. Since then, I’ve been super careful to avoid anything laid out on the streets no matter where I go.

I’ll add more as I keep adding to this blog. Until next time you guys!